Study Skills Step 10: Plan your Revision

Plan your revision. Get that A!
The examination hall is the final stage of your two years of studying. Good preparation will mean that you are going into the exams well prepared and well equipped to give your best performance on the day. 


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18 May 2016/Author: Ilona Havlickova/Number of views (3458)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Study Skills Step 9: Planning & Writing an Essay or Project

Plan and write your essays in school

Whatever you write, you need to plan and structure your writing so that it is not simple a collection of unconnected thoughts, ideas or facts. This is true whether you use a functional, personal or analytical style. 

 

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11 May 2016/Author: Dan Keating/Number of views (15885)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Study Skills Step 8: Write for Good Results

Find out how to write for good results in your exams

The purpose of writing is to communicate your ideas or information as clearly and as accurately as you can (in whatever subject). Good writing is about good communication. It shows that you have researched, selected, thought about, and ...

04 May 2016/Author: Dan Keating/Number of views (2891)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 4.5
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Study Skills Step 7: Summarising and Note-Taking Techniques

Objective: To summarise and make notes of the information you read so that is is easier to process in your brain because you understand it better and you retain and remember what you learn for longer

Note-taking strategies

 

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27 April 2016/Author: Dan Keating/Number of views (2708)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 3.3
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Study Skills Step 6: Read for Meaning

Learn how to read for meaning with step 6 of our guide.


Reading that has a specific purpose or intention has a powerful effect on memory. You remember more easily when you are actively looking for answers to specific questions or topics, and when you are interested in the material. 

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20 April 2016/Author: Dan Keating/Number of views (3167)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Study Skills Step 5: Organise Your Study Time

Organize your study time with this guide


1.
 Divide your study periods in terms of minutes or units (1 unit = half hour). Start small, especially if you have difficulties concentrating. You can always build up the time you spend studying once you have established the habit.

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13 April 2016/Author: Dan Keating/Number of views (3225)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 4.3
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Study Skills Step 4: Find Your Study Space

Leaving Cert Study Skills - Study Area

Find a workspace/room that you can always associate with study and homework. Keep the room airy but warm, and have good light to avoid eyestrain. Avoid using a family space (like the kitchen table) where you have to set up and clear away when others need it, as this will affect your ability and motivation to study.

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06 April 2016/Author: Dan Keating/Number of views (2712)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Study Skills Step 3: Put Your Goals Into Action.


Buy a year planner in any stationery shop or bookshop. lt is well worth the money. Pin it up in your study area. June might seem a long way off now, but when you break the school year down into terms, then weeks, your available time in real terms is probably less than half what you thought it was. It is a very useful visual reminder of the year ahead, and of how your time will get eaten into along the way.


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30 March 2016/Author: Dan Keating/Number of views (3341)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Study Skills Step 2: Achieving Your Goals



Success is not just about hard work. It is also about your attitude to your studies and your belief in your ability to succeed. Of course there is effort involved, but it is easier if you believe you can do it. Believing in yourself  

 

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23 March 2016/Author: Dan Keating/Number of views (1207)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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Study Skills Step 1: Learning Styles and Personalities

Study skills to get you ready

The traditional and somewhat narrow view of intelligence considered academic ability, or intelligence quotient (lQ), to be the main factor in determining who was "bright" or intelligent. More recently, this view has quite rightly been challenged, and it is now more commonly accepted that intelligence is in fact multi-faceted, and not a simply a matter of academic ability. There are different forms of intelligence e.g. ,physical, as in a top class football player, or an athlete. Just as top class athletes or footballers work to develop their abilities and skills, so you too can work to develop your learning capacity. It is important to find out where you’re strengths and your weaknesses as a learner lie.

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16 March 2016/Author: Dan Keating/Number of views (1231)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
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