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Understanding Easter 1916: A Quick Guide to the Easter Rising!

Understanding Easter 1916

One of the most significant periods in Irish History was the 1916 Easter Rising.  But in terms of studying Irish history, the 1916 Rising is also one of the most challenging! There was loads happening at the same time – nationalism, dual monarchism, Home Rule, different characters with different agendas, political scandal, political intrigue, military force versus guerrilla warfare, executions, betrayals: Ireland was extremely volatile and a highly dangerous place! One of the greatest challenges facing students who are studying this period is that there is just so much to remember, so much to learn! When you are revising large topics like the 1916 Rising, it is a good idea to focus on the main points first, keep it simple, and then get into the specifics!

Use the following study guide to help keep you on track when you are revising Easter 1916… it deals with the main ideas, causes, and consequences of the 1916 Rising and it helps you to look at the Rising from a couple of different perspectives.    

Click to Read More

 

15 October 2014/Author: Enda Feeney/Number of views (1033)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 4.0
Categories: Leaving Cert
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Understanding Easter 1916: A Quick Guide to the Easter Rising!

Author: Enda Feeney/15 October 2014/Categories: Leaving Cert

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One of the most significant periods in Irish History was the 1916 Easter Rising.  But in terms of studying Irish history, the 1916 Rising is also one of the most challenging! There was loads happening at the same time – nationalism, dual monarchism, Home Rule, different characters with different agendas, political scandal, political intrigue, military force versus guerrilla warfare, executions, betrayals: Ireland was extremely volatile and a highly dangerous place! One of the greatest challenges facing students who are studying this period is that there is just so much to remember, so much to learn! When you are revising large topics like the 1916 Rising, it is a good idea to focus on the main points first, keep it simple, and then get into the specifics!

Use the following study guide to help keep you on track when you are revising Easter 1916… it deals with the main ideas, causes, and consequences of the 1916 Rising and it helps you to look at the Rising from a couple of different perspectives.    

The 1916 Rising: why did Irish people want to rebel?

Following a lot of failed rebellions in the 18th and 19th Centuries, Ireland was still longing for independence from the British Empire. Then, World War 1 broke out, and Britain became heavily involved in the fighting overseas. With England busy fighting the war, some Irish politicians seen the opportunity to encourage Britain to award Home Rule to Ireland. Remember, Home Rule was NOT full independence – it only gave Ireland ‘semi-independence’ – and under Home Rule Ireland would have had its own parliament, it could have made its own laws, but Ireland would STILL have remained part of the British Empire.

Obviously, this was not good enough for nationalists who wanted a fully independent Ireland. Nationalist groups like the IRB and the Irish Volunteers planned to catch the British by surprise and stage a nationwide armed rebellion on Easter Sunday, 1916. In the end, the Rising was postponed until Easter Monday.  

The 1916 Rising: a Recipe for Disaster?

On paper, the Easter Rising looked like a good idea. Guns were coming from Germany, the IRB, the ICA, and the Irish Volunteers were mobilising across the country. But in reality, the Easter Rising was probably doomed to failure from the start. There are many, many different reasons for this, but here are the most important: firstly, it was badly organised. Eoin MacNeill kept changing his mind about whether he would order his Irish Volunteers to fight (this was partly because of his personal concerns and partly because he was tricked by the leaders of the Rising); the shipment of guns and ammo sent from Germany was seized by the British Navy before the Rising began; the Irish Volunteers did not have the support of civilians – civilians were either confused or indifferent when Pearse read out the Proclamation of the Irish Republic. Even throughout the Rising, most civilians hadn’t a clue what was going on: some thought it was a German invasion, some thought it was a socialist revolution, and others thought it was the ‘Sinn Féiners’ wreaking havoc on the city.  

Even the whole strategy of the Rising was a bad decision. The rebels chose to occupy buildings in Dublin: this was a really bad idea.  The rebels should have stayed on the move and used hit-and-run guerrilla tactics against the British.  But they didn’t – they chose to stay put, and this allowed the British forces to surround them and defeat them easily. Indeed, the disastrous strategy of the rebels has actually made many historians wonder if the rebels actually hoped to or wanted win…but we’ll get to that shortly!

Don’t forget Helga

Don’t forget that the British gunship, the Helga, also made matters worse by concentrating on shelling the rebels occupying the GPO. Imagine being stuck inside a building that is being bombed continually by a huge warship? Not pretty. By staying put in one location, the rebels became sitting ducks and were easy to defeat. 

What happened afterwards?

After a week of fighting, it became clear to everyone (including the rebels themselves) that the Rising had failed. Pearse, Connolly, and the other leaders surrendered. The British government thought that the Rising was part of a larger German plot (don’t forget that Britain was fighting Germany in WWI at this time). The British government decided to make an example out of the ‘ringleaders’: most of the leaders, including Pearse and Connolly, were executed.  But then a strange thing happened…

…When the British began to execute the leaders, lots of Irish people began to sympathise with the 1916 Rebels. They thought that the executions were barbaric and unnecessary, and they began to become hostile towards Britain. Fearing another, larger rebellion, Britain commuted (reduced) the remaining death-sentences into life-sentences and the executions stopped.

A different perspective on Easter 1916: Pearse, and the ‘Blood Sacrifice’

So, in military terms, the Rising was a definite failure: the leaders were arrested an executed, half of Dublin was destroyed, and Ireland was still part of the British Empire. But that is not the only way of looking at the Rising…what about Easter 1916 and Pearse’s idea of ‘blood sacrifice’? Remember when we said how some historians have actually wondered if Pearse and the other leaders even wanted to win during Easter Week? Well, this is where the blood sacrifice comes into the story…

What was the ‘blood sacrifice’?

To put it really simply, Padraic Pearse was an extreme nationalist: he became convinced that the best way to win Irish independence was through violence. Soon, he began developing and celebrating the idea of the ‘blood sacrifice’ – the idea that Irishmen needed to sacrifice their lives in order to win Irish independence. Pearse believed that the spilling of the blood of Irish patriots would inspire the rest of Ireland to rise up against Britain. Did Pearse and the other leaders know that they were going to die, that they were never going to win, but that their deaths might inspire Irish people to take up arms?

By executing the rebel leaders, the British government actually played into Pearse’s hands, and in some ways Pearse’s ‘blood sacrifice’ became a reality. The executions really brought the whole question of Irish independence into discussion, and in the wake of the executions many people in Ireland were no longer willing to accept Home Rule as being a good enough offer from Britain. Now, it was either full independence or nothing. So by looking at the Rising from the ‘blood sacrifice’ perspective, historians have argued that the Rising was in some ways a success – the rebels failed militarily (they were beaten by the British army), but they succeeded ideologically (lots of people now supported the movement for Irish independence).

 Easter Rising: Remember, keep it simple!

·         WW1 presented an opportunity for nationalists and Home Rulers.

·         A Rising was planned for Easter 1916 but it was badly planned and had no support from civilians.

·         The rebels took up bad positions and were defeated easily.

·         The rebels were unpopular at first, but after the executions people became sympathetic and supportive of the nationalist movement.

·         Remember Pearse’s idea of the blood-sacrifice…

 

   

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Understanding Easter 1916: A Quick Guide to the Easter Rising!

Understanding Easter 1916

One of the most significant periods in Irish History was the 1916 Easter Rising.  But in terms of studying Irish history, the 1916 Rising is also one of the most challenging! There was loads happening at the same time – nationalism, dual monarchism, Home Rule, different characters with different agendas, political scandal, political intrigue, military force versus guerrilla warfare, executions, betrayals: Ireland was extremely volatile and a highly dangerous place! One of the greatest challenges facing students who are studying this period is that there is just so much to remember, so much to learn! When you are revising large topics like the 1916 Rising, it is a good idea to focus on the main points first, keep it simple, and then get into the specifics!

Use the following study guide to help keep you on track when you are revising Easter 1916… it deals with the main ideas, causes, and consequences of the 1916 Rising and it helps you to look at the Rising from a couple of different perspectives.    

Click to Read More

 

15 October 2014/Author: Enda Feeney/Number of views (1034)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 4.0
Categories: Leaving Cert

Leaving and Junior Cert Blogs

Step 6: Read for Meaning

Over the next 10 weeks Mocks.ie will provide you with 10 necessary steps to study success. These involve:
Step 1: Learning Style and Personalities

Step 2: Achieve your goals

Step 3: Year Planner

Step 4: Primal Spot. Find your space to study

Step 5: Organize your study time

Step 6: Read for meaning

Step 7: Note taking strategies

Step 8: Write for good results

Step 9: Planning and writing an essay

Step 10: Plan your revision

Why Bother with Study Skills? The run up to the class tests and exams can be a stressful and difficult time thus anything that will improve your ability to study well is worth considering.

Making study worth your while You need to feel it is worth your while to invest the time, commitment, energy and application required to succeed in your studies. You need a clear purpose to keep your motivation and commitment high. You also need to learn how to use good organisational skills and effective study techniques. These will help you to:
• make more efficient use of your study time,
• make your learning easier and more effective,
• feel the work involved is worth the effort,
• increase your chances of doing well in examinations.

Changing your future Decide now what you want, and then put in place a plan of action that will help you to achieve your goals. It may not be easy all the time, but it is certainly possible. You are the one who is ultimately responsible for your achievements, and it will be your determination and hard work that sees you through.

Step 6: Read for Meaning
Objectives: To use techniques to give your reading a specific purpose and which help you to remember and retain the information more easily.
Reading is an active process in which you make meaning of what you read. All readers do this. Even young children (emergent readers) try to make sense of word  they don't actually know. So your brain is already geared towards looking for something. Build on this natural advantage, and when you study a textbook, always have a purpose: to find information.
 
Reading that has a specific purpose or intention has a powerful effect on memory. You remember more easily when you are actively looking for answers to specific questions or topics, and when you are interested in the material. Sounds simple? It is. Use the PQ3R technique (sometimes called the SQ3R)to improve your reading methods.
 
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02 October 2014/Author: Enda Feeney/Number of views (983)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Leaving and Junior Cert Blogs

Step 5: Organise Your Study Time

Over the next 10 weeks Mocks.ie will provide you with 10 necessary steps to study success. These involve:
Step 1: Learning Style and Personalities

Step 2: Achieve your goals

Step 3: Year Planner

Step 4: Primal Spot. Find your space to study

Step 5: Organize your study time

Step 6: Read for meaning

Step 7: Note taking strategies

Step 8: Write for good results

Step 9: Planning and writing an essay

Step 10: Plan your revision

Why Bother with Study Skills? The run up to the class tests and exams can be a stressful and difficult time thus anything that will improve your ability to study well is worth considering.

Making study worth your while You need to feel it is worth your while to invest the time, commitment, energy and application required to succeed in your studies. You need a clear purpose to keep your motivation and commitment high. You also need to learn how to use good organisational skills and effective study techniques. These will help you to:
• make more efficient use of your study time,
• make your learning easier and more effective,
• feel the work involved is worth the effort,
• increase your chances of doing well in examinations.

Changing your future Decide now what you want, and then put in place a plan of action that will help you to achieve your goals. It may not be easy all the time, but it is certainly possible. You are the one who is ultimately responsible for your achievements, and it will be your determination and hard work that sees you through.

Step 5: Organise Your Study Time
Objective: To put methods of making a study session workable.

1. Divide your study periods in terms of minutes or units (1 unit = half hour). Start small, especially if you have difficulties concentrating. You can always build up the time you spend studying once you have established the habit, and as your stamina increases.

2. Study for-25-30 minutes, then take a break, even for a few minutes, and then continue. This gives the brain a chance to rest and to make sense of or consolidate the learning.

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26 September 2014/Author: Enda Feeney/Number of views (521)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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Leaving Cert Business

Introducing the Blogs & Unit 1

Although there is not a huge amount of difficult material in the Leaving Cert Business course the sheer volume of theory to be learnt is something I myself as a leaving cert student found at times overwhelming when going to study this subject. It is important to remember, however, that business is all around us and often questions can be answered from looking at our own dealings with businesses or our habits as consumers. Business is a subject that to achieve that ‘A’ grade you not only need an extensive knowledge of the course but also how to approach questions and answer them efficiently to achieve maximum marks with minimum writing, as there is without doubt tight timing in the exam.  A set of comprehensive Revision Notes such as those provided by mocks.ie are essential and will help you develop a successful approach to the Business exam. We will also be providing sample answers in the coming weeks in addition to the Free Quick Notes which are already available such as those for the ABQ.
These blogs aim to do just that, and also give a general introduction to each topic. This should prove helpful before delving into detailed study of each unit. The topics that will be covered in each blog are as follows:
Blog 2- Unit 1
This unit consists of the chapters of people in business, consumer conflict and industrial relations conflict. I will discuss the key areas of each chapter and also give tips on how to make studying this chapter more manageable using study tools such as mind maps and acronyms. 
Blog 3- Unit 2 & 3
This blog will cover both Unit 2 (Enterprise) and Unit 3 (Management skills and activities) together as they tend to appear together as a long question in section 3 of the exam paper. I will also advise you on how to contrast entrepreneurs and managers as this is a question that has come up frequently in the past.
Blog 4- Unit 4 
We will cover Unit 4 in this blog which consists of HRM, change, accounting, insurance and tax and finance.
Blog 5- Marketing
This blog will focus exclusively on marketing as it is a detailed section of the course that makes an appearance on the paper every year in some shape or form.
Blog 6- Unit 5 
This will cover the remaining chapters in unit 5 that were not covered in the previous blog.
Blog 7- Unit 6
This blog will focus on unit 6 which contains the chapters: Business organisations, categories of industry, business the economy and government, community development and social responsibility. 
Blog 8- Unit 7
International Trade, European Union and Global Business will be covered in this blog. I will also give extra tips on the easiest way to study the European Institutions as this is an area of the course students in particular have difficulties with.
Blog 9- Everything ABQ
This blog will prepare you to answer the ABQ and get top marks in this section of the paper.
Blog 10- Exam tips
This blog will discuss how to manage your time in the exam, how many points to write for questions and how to answer questions in a clear, concise manner and achieve maximum marks. 
19 September 2014/Author: Enda Feeney/Number of views (158)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
Categories: Business
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Leaving Cert English

Juggling the Comparative Texts

Juggling the Comparative Texts
The Comparative Text question is worth 70 marks. This means that it is the only question on the paper which is worth more than the essay. How can you ensure that you achieve the maximum amount of those marks?

In the Comparative Text question, you will have to write an answer that compares and contrasts three different texts. It’s no mean feat, but it is very possible. We look at the actions of past A grade pupils, and at the guidelines set out by the Chief examiner in order to see where marks are being awarded in this question. If you follow this guideline to answering the question on the comparative texts, it will help you iron out the common difficulties students have, and will also give you an edge when it comes to getting your hands on every one of those 70 marks.
Firstly, as with all questions, study and planning is key. The good news here is that the areas of Theme or Issue, Literary Genre and General Vision and Viewpoint are already determined for you. The only unpredictable element will be the approach of the questions that fall under these headings. This means that you can have quite a large part of your answer well rehearsed before entering the exam hall.
Study and planning for the Comparative Question:
 
Comparative answers are simply multitasking by another name.
Comparative answers are unlike anything you would have experienced in the Junior Cert, but can very easily be mastered. The first step is accepting that you do not need the in-depth knowledge that is required for the single text. The second step is to familiarise yourself with exactly what the examiner is looking for in a high grade answer.

Of all the questions on the English paper, I always feel that this question takes the most discipline when answering it. However, contrary to popular belief, it is actually the easiest to prepare for.
1.    How well do I need to know each text?

Students often panic when it comes to answering the comparative question, because they feel they have to know each of the texts as well as they know their single text. This is not the case.
 
All you need to have is a clear understanding (main events and key issues for characters) of each of the texts along with good notes on each under the headings of Theme or Issue, Cultural Context and General Vision and Viewpoint.
Check out the website here for these headings, and you can apply them to your texts.
The essential ingredient is for students to personalise their answer and form their own opinions. These clever individuals are well rewarded with a high grade, so use these notes to develop an opinion in the light of your chosen texts.

You must also ensure that you have a strong knowledge of a number of key moments for each text. I would recommend four from each text to reflect the Comparative studies headings. That means 4 for Cultural Context, 4 for Theme or issue and 4 for General Vision and Viewpoint. Some of these will overlap - happy days, because juggling three texts is enough to deal with!
2.    “I never know what to say for the comparative answer! It’s just so complicated!”
 
Be confident with your opinions and structure your answer around the following key elements.
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18 September 2014/Author: Enda Feeney/Number of views (240)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 5.0
Categories: English
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